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@natgeo
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@natgeo

25 Mar 2020

222,053 Likes644 Comments

Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | Amid Italy's coronavirus emergency, I have chosen to continue working by photographing and interviewing (together with my friend Gea Scancarello) people who are locked in their Milan homes, in compliance with the quarantine imposed by the government. I left lights outside their windows, disinfecting them first. The subjects brought them inside; from outside, I directed how to position them. To take these photos, we've complied with all the necessary safeguards.
Before the quarantine started, Veronica Strazzari, 36, says she can’t remember ever spending a whole day at home. She lives in a 30-square-meters studio apartment, and since space is tight she spends a lot of time outside. With the outbreak of the epidemic, the company she works for—Prada—closed its offices, and she's pleasure in living in her home. “I’m discovering a dimension I’ve never experienced before, and I’m also surprised that I’m not anxious about the situation at all,” she says. She keeps some daily rituals: “I read a lot, every night I do yoga and pilates, and twice a week a total body workout with fan app. And then I spend a lot of time on Instagram, following new accounts. Yesterday, for example, I signed up for a tour-operator channel that offers travel videos.”
Also, she continues, “since I started the quarantine I’ve been keeping a diary of the things I learn every day. The most beautiful page is that of March 15: I had just finished a James Nachtwey book, titled Memory, which talks about photography as profound isolation, a necessary silence for understanding. I found it to be perfectly in tune with this situation.” Follow @natgeointhefield for real-time coverage of this developing story from photographers around the world.

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25 Mar 2020

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