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@physicaltherapyresearch
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672 Likes14 Comments

πŸ“šπŸ”¬
Risk Factors for Achilles Tendinopathy
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The presence of Achilles tendon pain, swelling and an impaired load-bearing capacity indicate Achilles Tendinopathy (AT).
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AT is most frequently seen in elite running athletes, with a lifetime risk of 52%.
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It should, however, be noted that one-third of all patients with AT have a sedentary lifestyle.
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This highlights a broad spectrum of potential risk factors for AT, yet the exact aetiology remains uncertain.
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Van Der Vlist, et al. (2019), systematically reviewed the literature regarding the potential clinical risk factors that have been investigated for AT. πŸ“ˆπŸ“ˆ
RESULTS:
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WHAT IS KNOWN?
Achilles tendinopathy is considered an overuse injury. However, the aetiology is unclear.β€¨πŸ“ˆ
Most commonly affects runners and running sports from 30Β yearsΒ old to 60 years old.β€¨πŸ“ˆ
Generally Accepted Risk Factors:
Being overweight.
Chronic diseases affecting tendon quality.
Use of fluoroquinolones or statins.
Weak plantar flexor strength.
Reduced ankle dorsiflexion.
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To date, conclusive evidence is missing.β€¨πŸ“ŠπŸ“Š
NEW FINDINGS!
A lack of high-quality studies explaining risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy.β€¨πŸ“Š
10 cohort studies identified, all with high risk of bias.β€¨πŸ“Š
Limited evidence exists for 9 Risk Factors for Achilles tendinopathy:
1. Prior lower limb tendinopathy or fracture
2. Use of ofloxacin antibiotics
3. Increased time between heart transplantation and initiation of quinolone treatment for infectious disease
4. Moderate alcohol use
5. Training during cold weather
6. Decreased isokinetic plantar flexor strength
7. Decreased forward propulsion in gait
8. Lateral rollover at forefoot flat phase
9. Creatinine clearance ofΒ <60 mL/min in heart transplant patients.
βœ…βœ…
CONCLUSIONS:
9 clinical factors were identified, which increase a person’s risk of Achilles tendinopathy. .
βœ…
When treating Achilles Tendinopathy, ofloxacin use, alcohol consumption and a reduced plantar flexor strength are modifiable risk factors.
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See the last post from @grapplersperformance for 1 of my favorite plantar flexion strength exercises. .
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SOURCE:
Van Der Vlist, et al. 2019. Clinical Risk Factors for Achilles Tendinopathy. BJSM

25 Jul 2019

Comments
  • @angeliquedeandrade

    @b13duplessis @danielledepinho96

    26 Jul 2019

  • @fabinou25_

    @angeline_grsp πŸ˜±πŸ˜±πŸ‘‹πŸ»

    25 Jul 2019

  • @areteforaday

    What would constitute a reduction in forward propulsion in gait? Any insight here from the authors?

    25 Jul 2019

  • @moabpt

    @hayesteph

    25 Jul 2019

  • @mac213

    Moderate alcohol use. Lol

    25 Jul 2019

  • @reiterbendjy

    @afuentes710

    25 Jul 2019

  • @danwoodsbhs

    I have this issue, my dad had the same issue in the same foot. I used to soak my foot in hot ( not scalding ) water and do a calf stretch and hold . Every day when I woke up. Seems to mitigate the issue. Then I would do High rep seated calf raises. Took 6 months but that foot is now stronger and more flexible that the other . Was really debilitating before , made my back hurt favoring it all the time.

    25 Jul 2019

  • @clellyrunning

    Excellent πŸ’ͺ

    25 Jul 2019

  • @ebocarson

    @paulawarnsman

    25 Jul 2019

  • @physicaltherapyresearch

    . . . #rehab #pain #painscience #physiology #physicaltherapy #physiotherapy #massage #orthopedic #chiropractic #medicine #sportsmedicine #science #research #health #wellness #nervoussystem #neuroscience #brain #physicaltherapyresearch #dpt #dptstudent #exercise #fitness #workout #achilles #achillestendonitis

    25 Jul 2019