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@physicaltherapyresearch
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893 Likes19 Comments

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Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS):
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3 Conflicting Causes:
1. Friction of ITB over epicondyle
2. Compression of Fat Pad and Pacinian Corpuscle
3. Inflammation
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ANATOMIC CONSIDERATIONS:
Proximally, provides an insertion for the TFL and gluteus maximus.
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Distal attachments include:
Biceps femoris
Vastus lateralis
Lateral patellar retinaculum
Patellar tendon
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BIOMECHANICS
During weight bearing:
Greater peak hip adduction and knee internal rotation
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Lower tibial internal rotation
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Femoral external rotation.
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Abnormal mechanics at the foot and the tibia and strain rate may play a role.
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Leg-length discrepancies have been reported as a factor in developing ITBS also.
πŸ’ͺ🏼 MUSCLE PERFORMANCE
TFL may dominate the weaker gluteus medius posterior and gluteus maximus, resulting in Trendelenburg pattern.
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Which could result in:
Poor control of the hip and femur during stance Excessive hip adduction
Knee Valgus or Varus
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EXTRINSIC FACTORS:
Repetitions at 30Β° of knee flexion in a closed-chain and weight-bearing position.
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Rapid increases in mileage/hill training
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CLINICAL EXAMINATON
Patient History
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Tenderness localized at lateral epicondyle
No symptoms indicating lateral joint line, popliteal tendon, or intra-articular disorders.
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Ober test:
Flexibility of lateral hip musculature .
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Noble test:
Compression over the lateral epicondyle at 30Β° knee flexion; elicits pain reproduction.
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Functional tests:
Trunk and lower-extremity strength
Excessive femur internal rotation
Ipsilateral hip adduction
Contralateral hip drop during a step-down test or Trendelenburg test
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TREATMENT
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Recommended Exercises:
Lateral hip stretch
Side-lying hip abduction and pelvic drops
Progressive closed chain exercises
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Bilateral closed chain exercises:
Relatively low vigor and used early to promote technique in squats
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Single-leg activities:
Higher vigor intended for strengthening the gluteal muscles.
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Read the full article for more info!
SOURCE:
Baker, Souza, and Fredericson, 2011. Iliotibial Band Syndrome: Soft Tissue and Biomechanical Factors in Evaluation and Treatment. PMR. 3(6), 550–561.

24 Oct 2019

Comments
  • @trainwisely

    @katharinalistmayr

    25 Oct 2019

  • @saire.official

    Doctor Elizabeth, @d0lc4 could you please explain me this. Thank you πŸ™

    24 Oct 2019

  • @physiozuhause.de

    πŸ‘Œ

    24 Oct 2019

  • @e.subialka

    @tmorstad here you go, treatment includes stretching! side lying abduction, pelvic drop (like a sideways step down on an aerobic step), and single leg stuff. Roll, stretch, strengthen the glute.

    24 Oct 2019

  • @robertamouzinho

    @tatianaalmeida.biologia

    24 Oct 2019

  • @iperformance_center

    Poor hip abduction strength and adaptive shortening of the RF is the cause! There is no leg length problem, the pelvis shifts making it appear that there is. Correct the pelvic obliquity that is caused by the weak hip abd and shortened RF!

    24 Oct 2019

  • @broalm

    GERDYS TUBERCLEEEE @meg_ahn_

    24 Oct 2019

  • @cbyogabarre

    @christitarziacycle thought you might like reading this

    24 Oct 2019

  • @seidupt12

    ❀️❀️πŸ”₯

    24 Oct 2019

  • @dan_reprimefitness

    Inflammation is an immune response. Thus it is NOT a cause

    24 Oct 2019

  • @physicaltherapyresearch

    . . . #rehab #pain #painscience #physiology #physicaltherapy #physiotherapy #massage #orthopedic #chiropractic #medicine #sportsmedicine #science #research #health #wellness #nervoussystem #neuroscience #brain #physicaltherapyresearch #dpt #dptstudent #exercise #fitness #workout #itbandsyndrome

    24 Oct 2019