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@physicaltherapyresearch
349 Likes26 Comments
349 Likes26 Comments

📚🔬
Safety of Blood Flow Restriction Training
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INTRO:
Blood flow restriction training (BFRT) partially restricts arterial blood flow into the muscle while venous outflow is occluded during exercise.
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Substantial strength gains can be elicited with lighter loads versus heavy resistance training.
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Current research has investigated a wide array of BFRT protocols and variables.
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To address varying advice and guidelines, some research has synthesized best evidence around standardized protocols.
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The use of BFRT during aerobic training and Resistance Training can be effective to increase muscle strength and size.
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The physiological mechanisms behind these muscle adaptations include:
Acute muscle cell swelling.
Increased fiber-type recruitment.
Decreased myostatin.
Decreased atrogenes.
Satellite cell proliferation.
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It is also important to consider the safety of BFRT.
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The issue of safety remains inconclusive and inconsistently reported.
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Given the conflicting literature and lack of a validated, standardized protocol, the consensus on safety of BFRT use in a clinical population is unknown.
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Minniti et al. (2019) assessed the potential adverse events associated with BFRT.
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RESULTS:
19 studies were eligible. .
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Injuries included:
Various knee-related disorders
Inclusion body myositis
Polymyositis
Dermatomyositis
Thoracic outlet syndrome
Achilles tendon rupture
Bony fractures. .
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Reports Included:
No adverse events (9 Studies)
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Rare adverse events (3 Studies) - [Upper lImb DVT and rhabdomyolysis]. .
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Common adverse events (3 Studies). - [Acute muscle pain and fatigue].
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BFRT was not more likely to cause adverse event vs normal exercise alone. .
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CONCLUSIONS:
BFRT appears to be a safe strengthening approach.
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Improved definitions of adverse events related to BFRT are needed to include clear criteria for differentiating among common, uncommon, and rare adverse events. .
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Effective screening for those at risk for rare adverse events is needed. .
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Thoughts? Questions? Comments?
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Write them below. .
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SOURCE:
Minniti et al. 2019. Safety of BFRT as a Therapeutic Intervention. The American Journal of Sports Medicine 1–13.

06 Dec 2019

Comments
  • @jessferg04

    Is it ok to use this if the patient has peripheral nerve injury?

    09 Jan 2020

  • @kaufminski

    @surajp9 maybe try BFRT while you're injured?

    06 Dec 2019

  • @jhorse89

    What does it do to the myostatin receptors?

    06 Dec 2019

  • @maddy_jawnnnnnnn

    @niles_keller

    06 Dec 2019

  • @louisloizoucy

    Very useful 👍👍

    06 Dec 2019

  • @vinisantosfisio

    @marcoserquiz

    06 Dec 2019

  • @daltonbhill

    Restricting blood flow for fitness purposes seems risky for such a minor reward, unless I’m a professional athlete that can’t break through a plateau I would probably avoid it all together

    06 Dec 2019

  • @silvester_a_

    @jimmymcdaniel_

    06 Dec 2019

  • @piecesof_mari

    Unfortunately we don't allow backpacks in out crammed gym

    06 Dec 2019

  • @maycom_thomas

    @wellingtondslj pega essa referência, meu fii. Tão seguro quanto exercício com carga elevada. Lê o artigo dps q eu vou ler também.

    06 Dec 2019

  • @raelynn.jalbert

    @jay7day

    06 Dec 2019

  • @fabi_sullo

    @kierllerena

    06 Dec 2019

  • @gwennstagram

    @tyluer_mikal_chancy is this you?!

    06 Dec 2019

  • @brock_rathman

    There is some concern regarding the safe use of BFR in the upper limb of overhead athletes, specifically baseball pitchers. Considering that the throwing motion can result in ulnar nerve compression as it “flosses” across the medial epicondyle during progressive flexion, pitchers can be potentially exposed to repeated neurovascular strain. I also read that strain across the ulnar nerve can occur as it interacts with the fascial tissue along the nerve. I wonder if this strain produced by the throwing motion is comparable to elbow flexion during BFR exercises, since the cuff would be compressing the circumference of the upper arm including the ulnar nerve? I had gains in strength and motion using upper arm BFR post-surgery, and as a former pitcher, did not have elbow complications. I still need to learn more as a student regarding these biomechanics, but it raises the question of how selective must a therapist be when deciding to implement BFR? I find BFR very interesting both from my own experience and as we see more research being produced. My source for this explanation of ulnar neuropathy was: Conservative Management Of Ulnar Neuropathy In Throwers John Pallof, PT, OCS, COMT, CSCS

    06 Dec 2019

  • @physicaltherapyresearch

    . . #rehab #pain #painscience #physiology #physicaltherapy #physiotherapy #massage #orthopedic #chiropractic #medicine #sportsmedicine #science #research #health #wellness #nervoussystem #neuroscience #brain #physicaltherapyresearch #dpt #dptstudent #exercise #fitness #workout #bloodflowrestriction #bloodflowrestrictiontraining #bfrt #bloodflow

    06 Dec 2019